KS3 (11-14)

Science at the movies

The story

A story making its way around the web at the moment is that NASA has compiled a list of the best and worst science movies ever made.  More

It’ll be raining cats and dogs next…

The story

Residents in a small town in Arkansas, USA started of their New Year with a bit of a mystery.

Over 3000 dead blackbirds fell from the sky on New Year’s Eve and experts are still not sure what caused it. More

It's Christmas!!

A very short post today as the pre-chrimbo lethargy is settling in as I suspect it is in most schools across the country.

However, I am aware that you may need some lessons to keep the children both entertained and educated so I present you with a couple of Christmas-themed physics lesson ideas which are suitable for KS2 and KS3 classes. More

Snow business

Down in the South of the UK where Snapshot Science hails from, the snow has long since melted and is it now practically tropical compared to the chilly North.

Assuming you are not sick to death of the very mention of the s-word, here are some snowy ideas for fun science lessons for the end of term which you could use (if school is open of course). More

Alien adaptation

The story

Monsters, the alien movie that was made on a shoe-string budget (reportedly around $200 000) is released in UK cinemas tomorrow. It may lack the eye-popping special effects of its predecessors but what it lacks in this department it may make up for in a realistic plot. Is this movie more science-fact than the usual science-fiction movie? More

A micro pig is not just for Christmas

The story

Micro-pigs are the latest celebrity pet craze after Paris Hilton has been with a tiny pig in her handbag and Posh spice has reportedly bought two for David Beckham. More

Moonwatch

The story

The society for Popular Astronomy is organising a Moonwatch event which starts this Wednesday (17th) and runs until the following Sunday.  During this time the Moon will go through a number of phases from crescent to full.

They have a website dedicated to the event which encourages teachers to study the Moon with their classes as it is visible after school from about 4:30pm onwards.  They advise using a telescope or binoculars if you want to study the surface of the Moon and have pages on the website which detail the features that you will be able to spot.

Teaching idea and resources

Inspired by the Moonwatch event I have uploaded a Moonwatch PowerPoint which contains some simple starter questions which can be used with a class when studying the solar system.

When I taught this in the past I used to tell my class that the Moon changed shape because it is made from cheese and space mice ate it.  When the whole Moon was eaten it disappeared, only to be replaced by a new ball of cheese from the Mouse God who lived behind the sun.  Of course – they told me that this was total rubbish but it made them think when I asked them how they were so sure – what proof did they have that my theory was wrong?

There is also a moon phases worksheet that asks students to predict what the Moon will look like from Earth during various points during its orbit.  They can check their answers by watching one of the animations linked below.

If you want your students to take part in the Moonwatch event but don’t have the equipment to view the moon, why not ask the students to complete a ‘Moon diary’ for the event?  They can view the Moon every night at home and then draw each phase.  You can then use their observations as a basis for discussion in the classroom.

Weblinks

The Moonwatch week website

Simple animation showing the phases of the moon.  Suitable for KS2/3 students.

More complicated animation suitable for high ability KS3 students and KS4.

Bonfire night bonanza

Bonfire night gives a great opportunity to put an exciting spin on chemistry.

Of course – you can demonstrate flame tests; sprinkle iron filings into a Bunsen flame to make a pretty sparkler affect or carry out a spot of fire-writing (see weblink below).

All of these are fun but tend to fill the lab with smoke and mess, not to mention they can only be done with classes who are on their best behaviour. More

Space tourism

The story

How long will it be before visiting space will be as common an event as boarding a flight to Spain?  And will we be holidaying on Mars rather than Marbella in the future? More

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