KS5 (16+)

Science in the News-letter #14

A nice mix of stories in this week’s newsletter. For biology there are links to stories about the nervous system and infectious disease. For physics: how viruses are being used to generate electricity (ok, so there is a bit of biology in there as well) and for chemistry, looking at the possibility of a manned NASA mission to asteroids to mine for minerals (tedious link to chemistry I know – I would really appreciate anyone point me in the right direction so I can find more chemistry based news!).

 

Science in the News-letter #13

Two very different wind related stories are featured in this week”s edition:

how did dinosaur wind keep the prehistoric planet warm and should the biggest wind farm in England and Wales be built?

 

 

Science in the News-letter #12

Are your students pro or anti-nuclear power and what arguments can they use to support their views? Do they understand what ‘pharming’ is or what scientists use the LHC for? In the week’s Science in the News-letter they can find all this out and more – just download by clicking on the button below.

 

 

How to see around corners

image: CILAS @ wikimedia

A simple starter I often used when introducing the topic of light with year 8 was to give them a problem to solve: More

Space vacation

The story

Getting into space the traditional way, in a space shuttle, is an expensive process but at least we know it works. Is travelling up in an elevator attached to a 36 000 km cable any more cost effective or realistic? More

Rare Disease Day 2012

Raise and hold hands at 12 noon today and show your Solidarity with rare disease patients around the world.

The main purpose of Rare Disease Day is to make more people aware of the 6000 – 8000 rare diseases that affect people around the world. A rare disease is one that affects less than 1 in 2000 people; most are life threatening and the majority have no cure. More

Global warming in fast-forward

This video comes courtesy of NASA and shows how global temperatures have changed over the last 131 years.  It would make a great starter to any lesson on climate change.  You can clearly see that temperatures started to showed a significance increase from the 1970s due to an increase in greenhouse gas emissions from energy production, industry and vehicles. Students could be asked to spot this trend and come up with an explanation for it.

Spider-goat, spider-goat…

Credit: the prodigal untitled13 @ Flickr

…does whatever a spider-goat does.

Can she swing

from a web?

No she can’t

she’s a goat…

…however, she can produce spider silk proteins in her milk.

More

Hamster Power

Credit: Mylius at wikimedia

The story

Did you know:  The hamster species P.roborovskii have been said to run the equivalent of four human marathons per night?

This interesting but apparently useless fact came to my attention via Guardian blogger Grrl Scientist.  The blog post went on to explain the ways that all this kinetic energy could be harnessed to power electrical devices and I thought that it might be a fun way of teaching about energy transfer.

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Baby scientists

The story

I received an interesting letter in the post last week inviting my two year old daughter to take part in an international research study.

Feeling rather proud that scientists have realised her potential so early, I read on wondering what research they would exactly need her to carry out. More

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